Effectiveness of topical silicone gel and pressure garment therapy for burn scar prevention and management in children: a randomised controlled trial

Ms Jodie Wiseman1, Dr. Megan Simons2, Professor Roy Kimble3, Dr. Zephanie Tyack1

1Centre For Children’s Burns And Trauma Research, South Brisbane, Australia, 2Occupational Therapy Department – Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital, South Brisbane, Australia, 3Pegg Leditschke Childrens Burns Centre – Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital, South Brisbane, Australia

Abstract:

Background:Abnormal burn scarring can cause physical and psychological distress to children and their families. Despite widespread use of topical silicone gel and pressure garment therapy for burn scar prevention and management, the effectiveness of these interventions is unclear. This study aimed to determine the effectiveness of these interventions in children.

Methods:A randomised controlled trial was conducted with children with burns that healed spontaneously after 17 days or more, or required grafting, or received reconstruction surgery for a pre-existing burn scar. Participants were randomised into: (1) Topical silicone gel only, (2) pressure garment therapy only, or (3) combined therapies groups. Participants were reviewed at baseline (95% wound healing), one week post scar management commencement, three and six months post-burn or burn scar reconstruction surgery. The primary outcomes included scar thickness and itch intensity. Secondary outcomes included treatment satisfaction, health-related quality of life and scar characteristics. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and mixed models regression.

Results:Participants recruited at baseline (n = 153) had a median (IQR) age of 4 (1, 10) years and % total body surface area of 1% (0.5, 3), and 65% were male. Results will be presented for changes in scar thickness and itch intensity as well as therapist and caregiver treatment satisfaction at 6-months post-burn.

Discussion:This study determined the effectiveness of three commonly used burn scar interventions in children post-burn. Results provide health services with evidence based recommendations for the prevention and management of paediatric post-burn scarring.


Biography:

Jodie is an Occupational Therapist undertaking her PhD with the Centre for Children’s Burns and Trauma Research at the University of Queensland and Pegg Leditschke Children’s Burns Centre. Jodie’s research is focused on the effectiveness of topical silicone gel and pressure garment therapy in the prevention and management of burn scarring in children.