Early therapy experience with NovoSorb™ BTM

Mr Brad Schmitt1, Mrs Kathryn  Heath2, Mrs Rochelle Kurmis3, Ms  Tanja  Klotz4, Mr Marcus Wagstaff5, Professor John Greenwood6

1Senior Physiotherapist, Adult Burns Service, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Port Road, Adelaide, Australia, 2Allied Health Project Manager, Adult Burns Service, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Port Road, Adelaide, Australia, 3Allied Health Project Manager, Adult Burns Service, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Port Road, Adelaide, Australia, 4Senior Occupational Therapist, Adult Burns Service, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Port Road, Adelaide, Australia, 5Consultant Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon, Adult Burns Service, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Port Road, Adelaide, Australia, 6Director, Adult Burns Service, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Port Road, Adelaide, Australia

Abstract:

Background: Since 2014, NovoSorb™ BTM has been used at the Royal Adelaide Hospital to treat specific deep burn wounds.¹ Currently patients are treated in line with standard therapy protocols. As a new dermal substitute for the treatment of burn injury, the implication for the use of this product on anticipated rehabilitation times, therapy pathways and scar management compared to previous standard treatment is unknown.

Aim: To map the pattern of recovery following BTM application compared to a historic matched burn cohort.

Methods: Patients who have received BTM as part of their surgical burn wound management were identified from existing department records. Matched, retrospective cohort patients were identified based on burn size, depth, age and gender from the BRANZ database. No exclusion criteria were applied. BTM site, time post BTM application to commence range of motion (ROM), mobilisation, maximal ROM, scar management requirements and duration, scar outcome, incidence of reconstructive surgery, and length of ICU and hospital stay were collected.

Results:Twenty patients (15 male, 5 female; age 17-94 years) admitted with burn injuries ranging from 5-75 % TBSA and treated with BTM were included in this this review. Average length of stay = 82.2days (range 1.2-258.2 days). To date, nine patients have completed 12 month follow-up POSAS and MAPS assessments.

Conclusion:The use of BTM following deep burn injury comparatively decreases the amount of scar management, rehabilitation and reconstructive surgery required. The pattern of recovery following BTM and subsequent care pathway recommendations will be presented.

References:
1.Greenwood JE, Schmitt BJ and Wagstaff MJD. Experience with a synthetic bilayer Biodegradable Temporising Matrix in significant burn injury. Burns Open. DOI: 10.1016/j.burnso.2017.08.001


Biography:

Brad is the Senior Physiotherapist with the Royal Adelaide Hospital Burns Unit.