60 years Burns Service at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital, South Australia

HP Chong1, E Gibson1, L Quinn1R Cooksey1,D Molony1,A Jeeves1, M Lodge1,B Carney1

1Women’s And Children’s Hospital, North Adelaide, Australia

Abstract:

Introduction: Burns are a preventable cause of pediatric injury with over 100 000 annual hospitalizations. The authors hypothesize that analysis of injury patterns can generate age-specific and injury-specific prevention strategies to reduce these injuries.

Methods: A retrospective study of data from the unit’s local registry was collected over a 50 year period. Cross-tabulations were employed to examine associations. An analysis of variance model was used to examine differences in injury pattern.

Results: Treating burns in children less than 1 year accounted for the majority of inpatient and outpatient service. The most common mechanism of injury was scalds from a hot beverage or hot noodles, followed by contact burn to iron, and friction burns from treadmill.

CONCLUSIONS:
We would like to place emphasis on public education targeting parents with infants to exercise extra precaution in circumstances that can result in these accidental burn injuries.


Biography:

HP Chong is the Burns Fellow at WCH and previous unaccredited registrar at Flinders Medical Centre