Pressure garments for paediatric burn scar management: Preliminary data from a longitudinal cohort study

Jodie Wiseman1, Dr. Megan Simons2, Professor Roy Kimble3, Dr. Zephanie Tyack1

1 Centre for Children’s Burns and Trauma Research, 62 Graham Street South Brisbane, QLD, 4101, jodie.wiseman@uqconnect.edu.au; z.tyack@uq.edu.au
2 Occupational Therapy Department – Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital, 501 Stanley Street South Brisbane, QLD, 4101, megan.simons@health.qld.gov.au
3 Surgical Directorate – Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital, 501 Stanley Street South Brisbane, QLD, 4101, royk@health.qld.gov.au

Background

Pressure garments are accepted as standard practice for the management of burn scars around the world, although there is mixed evidence regarding their effectiveness. This study aims to investigate pressure changes over the life of garments and factors contributing to pressure loss in garments.

Methods

Preliminary data will be presented from an ongoing longitudinal cohort study of children wearing their first pressure garment post-burn. This study aims to recruit 53 participants less than 18 years of age.  The primary outcome included pressure beneath pressure garments (Pliance X device, mmHg). All outcomes were measured at first pressure garment fitting, one and three months post-fitting. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Parametric and non-parametric statistics will determine the factors contributing to pressure loss.

Results

Participants included 19 children aged 2 to 13 years, with median Total Body Surface Area burns of 2% (IQR: 5.5%). Median (IQR) baseline pressures beneath pressure garments varied across body locations, for example: glove = 13.77mmHg (17.78mmHg), sock = 17.55mmHg (19.985mmHg). A median pressure loss of 8.11mmHg was recorded after one month of glove wear. During movement, a minimum and maximum pressure of 11.5mmHg and 191mmHg respectively was recorded for an elbow garment.  Factors influencing pressures will be presented.

Conclusion

Large variations were found in the pressures supplied by pressure garments. Determining the type of pressure garments that provide the most consistent pressure within the range found to be most effective (15-25mmHg) will inform the design of a randomised control trial into the effectiveness of pressure garments and topical silicone gel.

Key Words

Burns, scar management, pressure garment, children

Biography

Jodie is an Occupational Therapist who is undertaking her PhD with the Centre for Children’s Burns and Trauma Research, University of Queensland. Jodie’s research is investigating the effectiveness of non-invasive burn scar management in children including a randomised control trial on the effectiveness of pressure garments and topical silicone gel. Jodie is also currently working as a research assistant with the Centre for Children’s Burns and Trauma Research and has four years of clinical experience working across community, hospital and private practice settings.

About ANZBA

ANZBA is a not for profit organisation and the peak body for health professionals responsible for the care of the burn injured in Australia and New Zealand. ANZBA encourages higher standards of care through education, performance monitoring and research.

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