“What’s the difference between this wound and that wound?” The biochemical differences between burns of different depth

Tuo Zang1, Daniel A. Broszczak2, Leila Cuttle3, Tony J. Parker4

1Tissue Repair and Regeneration Program, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Qld, Australia, 4059, t.zang@qut.edu.au
2Tissue Repair and Regeneration Program, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Qld, Australia, 4059, d.broszczak@qut.edu.au
3Centre for Children’s Burns and Trauma Research, Queensland University of Technology, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation at the Centre for Children’s Health Research, South Brisbane, Qld, Australia, 4101, leila.cuttle@qut.edu.au
4Tissue Repair and Regeneration Program, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health, Queensland University of Technology, Kelvin Grove, Qld, Australia, 4059, t.parker@qut.edu.au

Burn blister fluid analysis provides an opportunity to not only non-invasively investigate the biology of the initial stages of burn injury but also to help uncover novel diagnostics to assist in clinical decision making and perhaps identify new therapeutic approaches to enhance healing.

We have performed a large scale protein and metabolite analysis of paediatric burn wound blister fluids from superficial-, deep-, or full thickness burns. Here we report on the very significant over representation of biochemistry associated with extracellular vesicles and coagulation cascade mediators. We also discuss what this difference in wound biochemistry may reveal about burn biology in the early stages of the burn injury process.

Key Words

Paediatric burn, burn depth, proteomics, blister fluid

Biography

Dr Tony Parker is the program leader of the Tissue Repair and Regeneration Program (TRR) at the Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation (IHBI) at the Queensland University of Technology.  Dr Parker’s conducts proteomics, metabolomics and cellular research into the mechanisms and biochemical implications of tissue injury and recovery processes and of health promoting physical activity. In particular, Dr Parker and his students and colleagues have developed the workflows required for the proteomic and metabolomic investigation of wound and tissue fluids at IHBI, QUT.

About ANZBA

ANZBA is a not for profit organisation and the peak body for health professionals responsible for the care of the burn injured in Australia and New Zealand. ANZBA encourages higher standards of care through education, performance monitoring and research.

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