The effect of sedation and inotropic support on the achievement of verticality in burns patients admitted to ICU. A retrospective observational cohort study.

Miss Lauren Bright1, Associate Professor Dale Edgar2,3,4, Mrs Lisa van der Lee5, Dr Dana Hince6, Professor Fiona Wood2,4

1The University Of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle, Australia, 2State Adult Burn Unit, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Murdoch, Australia, 3Burn Injury Research Node, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle, Australia, 4Fiona Wood Foundation, Murdoch, Australia, 5Intensive Care Unit, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Murdoch, Australia, 6Institute for Health Research, The University of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle, Australia

Abstract:

Introduction:

Early rehabilitation for severe burns survivors is arguably more challenging than in the general ICU population. Early achievement of verticality is influenced by acute skin reconstruction, sedation practices and patient cardiovascular stability, and has the potential to address the detrimental effects of immobility identified in ICU patients and reduce healthcare costs.

Objectives/Aims:

The aim of this study is to identify the impact of sedation and inotropic support on cessation of complete bed rest in burns patients admitted to ICU.

Methods:

Poisson regression will be used to investigate the association between the rate of verticality and sedation and inotrope use. Additional models will investigate the association between rate of verticality and other factors of interest (e.g. TBSA, duration of mechanical ventilation, surgeries and adverse events).

Results:

70 patients (male n=49, female n=21) were included in the sample with mean TBSA of 22.98% and 26 cases <10%, 26 cases 10—29%, 9 cases 30-49% and 9 cases >50% TBSA. 6 deaths occurred in ICU. Mean and median ICU length of stay was 7.46 days and 2.5 days respectively with 75.71% (n=53) of patients being mechanically ventilated. 41.43% (n=29) of patients were transferred via air from a rural location. Upon ICU discharge, 68.57% (n=48) of patients had achieved sitting over the edge of the bed and 60% (n=42) of patients had achieved standing on at least one occasion throughout their ICU stay. The use of a tilt table facilitated 3 patients in achievement of verticality.

Data analysis is currently in progress.


Biography:

Lauren Bright is a Physiotherapist and recent graduate from The University of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle.

About ANZBA

ANZBA is a not for profit organisation and the peak body for health professionals responsible for the care of the burn injured in Australia and New Zealand. ANZBA encourages higher standards of care through education, performance monitoring and research.

Conference Managers

Please contact the team at Conference Design with any questions regarding the conference.

Photo Credits: Tourism Tasmania, Adam Gibson, Sarajayne Lada, Julia Smith, The Henry Jones

© 2017 Conference Design Pty Ltd