The Shared Value of Consumer Engagement

Mr Dale Forbes1, Mrs Anne Darton2

1Agency of Clinical Innovation Statewide Burn Injury Service Consumer Representative, , , 2Agency of Clinical Innovation Statewide Burn Injury Service, 

Abstract:

The National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards provide a national mandate for Health Services to engage meaningfully with consumers. However, there is no consistent approach to achieving this in the provision of a clinical burns service across Australia.

This presentation highlights the vital role of consumer representatives in a burns service. The shared value can be realised when clinicians and consumers partner to co design innovative health care improvements.

Consumer engagement provides an empathetic and respectful framework that brings together professional knowledge and best practice evidence and lived experience to design, implement and evaluate improvements, activities, products and services.

The NSW Statewide Burn Injury Service has embedded consumer participation in its burn service using a number of strategies. These are based on the principles of equal partnership, openness, respect, empathy and designing together. Key initiatives include the SHARE Peer Support Program, Patient Reported Experience Measures Project and the Beyond Burns Online Hub Project.

Lastly, this presentation discusses the emerging evidence around improved outcomes and how burn survivors only stand to benefit as clinical burns services work more collaboratively as a network partnering with consumers.


Biography:

Dale Forbes is an Aboriginal man from Rural NSW. Dale has a lived experience as a Burn Survivor in addition to growing up in Out of Home Care. Dale has been heavily involved in volunteering and charitable work in burns sector for many years. Dale is currently finishing a Bachelor of Social Work while working as an Aboriginal Senior Project Officer with the NSW Department of Family and Community Services. Dale has been a driving force behind the Beyond Burns project from the initial conception through to the design and development and has a deep commitment to collaborative consumer centred approaches

Beyond Burns Online Hub – A Co Design Approach

Mr Dale Forbes1, Mrs Anne Darton2

1Agency of Clinical Innovation Statewide Burn Injury Service Consumer Representative, , , 2Agency of Clinical Innovation Statewide Burn Injury Service,

Abstract:

The challenges facing burn survivors are numerous and can often take many years to overcome. Some of these include: anxiety, depression, altered body image and social adjustment. The Australian burns landscape features a mix of government and NGO health services offering a variety of therapeutic support models commonly used in burn survivor rehabilitation and recovery however, the availability and accessibility of burns support and services is varied and often limited.

A co-design approach has been used in the development of this project. Burn Survivors and burn clinicians across Australia and New Zealand have been partners in the development of themes, features and functions of this online space. The attributes identified through this process are to create a space that is trustworthy, safe and gives support and continued engagement.

Beyond Burns key message is to let burn survivors know they are not alone in their experience. Primarily focused on improving long term psychosocial outcomes for burn survivors, the online hub provides many different ways for burn survivors to connect to others in the community, whether it is by accessing quality burns medical resources, reading personal stories or connecting to others through chat.

The online hub will be the leading support platform for the burns community, providing a centralised and comprehensive directory of services and provide a safe space where other burn survivors can give back to support and empower the burns community.


Biography:

Dale Forbes is an Aboriginal man from Rural NSW. Dale has a lived experience as a Burn Survivor in addition to growing up in Out of Home Care. Dale has been heavily involved in volunteering and charitable work in burns sector for many years. Dale is currently finishing a Bachelor of Social Work while working as an Aboriginal Senior Project Officer with the NSW Department of Family and Community Services. Dale has been a driving force behind the Beyond Burns project from the initial conception through to the design and development and has a deep commitment to collaborative consumer centred approaches

A Brief Psychosocial Screening Program- Acceptable to Both Patient and Clinician? Initial Feedback 

 Katherine A. Skinner1, Deborah Murray2, Kathryn Russell3 

 1 National Burn Centre, Middlemore Hospital, Private Bag 13 311 Otahuhu, Auckland 1640, New Zealand  

National Burn Centre, Middlemore Hospital, Private Bag 13 311 Otahuhu, Auckland 1640, New Zealand 

3 National Burn Centre, Middlemore Hospital, Private Bag 13 311 Otahuhu, Auckland 1640, New Zealand 

 People who sustain a burn injury typically come from a vulnerable sector of the population. They may have diagnosed or undiagnosed psychological conditions, or be affected by psychosocial stressors pre-injury. Post-injury adjustment to surgical and rehabilitative treatment is an additional stressor of variable duration. Psychological issues with onset pre- or post-injury are likely to impact rehabilitation and return to previous social and vocational functioning. To improve patient outcomes psychological issues require intervention. Psychological screening can identify issues that would not otherwise be disclosed, and target assessment and treatment within the service and in the community. 

Until now patients who have been discharged from the National Burn Centre, Middlemore Hospital have not been routinely offered psychosocial screening. A psychosocial screening program for all patients who attend the National Burn Centre outpatient clinic aims to improve access to psychosocial supports including psychological assessment and treatment, and community alcohol and drug treatment. A brief psychosocial screen for patient anxiety, depression, PTSD, suicidality, alcohol, and substances was adapted from a previously validated instrument and administered during outpatient appointments. As well as being acceptable to patients, the instrument needed to be easy to administer and score for clinic staff. Preliminary patient data from an audit of the psychosocial screening program and team feedback on use of the instrument is presented. 

 References 

Dhalla, S., & Kopec, J. A. (2007). The CAGE Questionnaire for Alcohol Misuse: A Review  

of Reliability and Validity Studies. Clinical & Investigative Medicine, 30(1), 33-41. doi:10.25011/cim.v30i1.447 

 Löwe, B., Wahl, I., Rose, M., Spitzer, C., Glaesmer, H., Wingenfeld, K., . . . Brähler, E.  

(2010). A 4-item measure of depression and anxiety: Validation and standardization of the Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4) in the general population. Journal of Affective Disorders, 122(1-2), 86-95. doi:10.1016/j.jad.2009.06.019 

 Prins, A., Ouimette, P., Kimerling, R., Cameron, R. P., Hugelshofer, D. S., Shaw-Hegwer,  

J., . . . Sheikh, J. I. (2003). Primary Care PTSD Screen. Primary Care Psychiatry, 9(1), 8-14. doi:10.1037/t04709-000 

 

 

 

 

 

The trials and tribulations of peer-led burns support initiatives in Australia: are we ‘throwing the baby out with the bath water’?

Ms Martha Druery1, Ms Charlotte  Adderley2, Mr Andrew Brown2

1Burns Trauma and Critical Care Research Centre, UQ, Brisbane, Australia, 2Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital Foundation – Burnslife, Brisbane, Australia

Abstract:

Peer support is an empirically useful adjunct to specialist multidisciplinary burn care in assisting both adult and paediatric burns survivors to live fulfilling lives post-injury. Formal peer support programs are resource-intensive for burns centres to operate and are therefore not currently standard practice, with a few exceptions. Therefore charities have historically arisen to provide valuable opportunities for burns survivors to meet, learn and share their experiences in both formal and informal settings.

This paper will provide an insight into the challenges that peer support programs have faced in Australia and introduce an overview of the strategies employed by Burnslife, a peer-led initiative of the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital Foundation, to address some of the inherent risks. The opportunity will be presented for conference delegates to consider the ways in which peer support is facilitated or discouraged in their local units. As burns survivors and ‘users’ of health-care services in general, become more empowered to access information online or in-person, it is vital for burns services to leverage professional expertise and optimise consumer engagement over the long-term.


Biography:

Martha Druery is currently enrolled in a Research Higher Degree at UQ, having previously worked as a Social Work Specialist in Intensive Care and Burns across adult and paediatric settings since 1997. She remains actively involved in the burns field with first author publications, private practice adjustment to injury counselling services and volunteer work as a Psychosocial Clinical Advisor with Burnslife, in Queensland. Her PhD is investigating the quantitative relationship between burns outcomes and domains such as injury, treatment, personal and social factors.

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo (Removed): An Overview of Tattoo Physiology, Reactive Lymphadenitis, Removal, and Scarring

Dr Larsa Al-Omaishi1,2, Dr Ralph Corsetti2

1Greenslopes Private Hospital, Greenslopes, Australia, 2The University of Queensland – Ochsner Clinical School of Medicine, New Orleans, USA

Abstract:

The popularity of tattoos is rising in America and Australia. A 2016 Harris Poll and McCrindle Survey showed that 29% of Americans and 19% of Australians have at least one tattoo, respectively. Furthermore, a quarter of American (23%) and Australian (24%) individuals regret their body art, leading to the rise of laser tattoo removal. Tattoos are also being used as permanent makeup, scar camouflaging, and nipple recreation post-mastectomy.

Tattoos are created by injecting an ink into the dermis using needles that penetrate the epidermis at 50-3,000Hz. Three months after the ink’s deposition, granulation tissue initially created by the traumatic process is replaced by ink-enveloping fibroblasts which cause permanence. However, ultraviolet light can cause pigments to degrade. Phagocytes engulf pigment fragments then migrate deep into the dermis. The pigments then travel via lymphatics, which can result in reactive lymphadenitis mimicking lymphoma, metastatic skin, or breast cancer.

There are no regulatory or safety requirements whatsoever for tattoo ink manufactured in the USA, the largest supplier of tattoo inks worldwide. The process of removal involves using a high energy beam to break apart the ink pigments into smaller particles that can be consumed by macrophages. Pigments that are harder to break apart, such as blues and reds, are more difficult to, “remove,” than smaller black nanoparticles. Because multiple sessions are required to break apart the pigment in larger tattoos, skin can burn and result in scars. Alternatively, scars created by the initial tattoo process may reveal themselves when tattoos are removed.


Biography:

Dr. Al-Omaishi graduated as a member of the 2017 Ochsner cohort of the University of Queensland. This cohort returns to the US for years 3 and 4 of clinical training. Dr. Al-Omaishi is currently undertaking an internship at Greenslopes Private Hospital and is particularly interested in trauma surgery, surgery in developing countries, and population health research.

Representations of Facial Scars in Film

Dr Isobel Yeap1, Dr Kersandra Begley1, Dr  Aruna Wijewardana1, Dr John Vandervord1

1Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia

Abstract:

Background: The villain with the scarred or disfigured face is a widespread trope in contemporary film. Often, facial scars serve as a visual metaphor for the hurt or damage that a character has been through, as well as a defining characteristic that marks the character as the villain.

Aim: To systematically collect and analyse data on the representation of facial scars in the most commonly watched films. The null hypothesis is that the representation of facial scars in film will be a negative one.

Method: Data were collected from the 100 worldwide highest grossing films including the number of characters with facial scars, their sex, whether they were heroes, villains or morally ambiguous characters and whether or not their scars were covered.

Results: The findings indicate that 50% (27/54) of the films included a character with facial scars. These 27 films included 44 characters with facial scars. The majority of characters with facial scars were male (93%; 41/44) and villains (59%; 26/44). We then classified the characters’ scars as either obvious or subtle and found that villains were much more likely to have obvious scars (58%; 15/26) compared with heroes (29%; 4/14).

Conclusion: Rather than being portrayed as a benign variation in human appearance, or even as a metaphor for resilience, facial scars are most often deployed as an insidious visual reminder that the character is damaged or bad. This likely contributes to the negative stigma faced by patients who have suffered facial burns that have caused conspicuous scarring.


Biography:

Isobel is a resident medical officer who has worked with the Severe Burns Unit and Plastic Surgery Department at Royal North Shore Hospital. Prior to studying medicine, she completed her Bachelor (Honours) in Economics. She also works as a film writer for online for 4:3 Film.

About ANZBA

ANZBA is a not for profit organisation and the peak body for health professionals responsible for the care of the burn injured in Australia and New Zealand. ANZBA encourages higher standards of care through education, performance monitoring and research.

Conference Managers

Please contact the team at Conference Design with any questions regarding the conference.

© 2020 Conference Design Pty Ltd